All news

Saluting College of Law and Management Doctoral Graduates

September 11, 2017


It was joy and jubilation at the University of KwaZulu-Natal’s very first spring Graduation. Twenty-three doctorates were conferred in the College of Law and Management Studies in a ceremony held at the Westville campus.


The Acting Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Head of the College of Law and Management Studies, Professor Managay Reddi, congratulates the College’s 23 graduates - seven of whom are staff members - who received their doctoral degrees in this year’s Spring Graduation.

This brings the total number of doctoral degrees awarded by the College in 2017 to 60 which is a first in the College’s history.

‘As a College we have been working tirelessly to transform ourselves in terms of our research productivity and are pleased with the results. The increase in the number of our doctoral graduates shows that the many interventions adopted by the College, including the monitoring of the PhD project on a regular basis, are bearing fruit.’

‘While we considered the award of 43 doctoral degrees in 2016 to be a big success, the fact that we have exceeded this number this year is a wonderful accomplishment. All credit for this must go to the staff in our four Schools who are the drivers of our success. Most exciting is that 12 of our own staff members obtained their PhDs this year. I therefore have much pleasure, on behalf of our entire College, to again congratulate our staff and students on their noteworthy achievement and I look forward to us reaching even greater heights in the future in our research outputs and productivity,’ said Professor Reddi.

MEET OUR DOCTORAL GRADUATES:





 Dr Sarpong Prince 


  Thesis Title: Trading in Chaos: Analysis of Active Management in a Fractal Market
Supervisor: Professor Mabutho Sibanda

The research studied the anomaly in financial markets. The study found that contrary to traditional finance theory, the Small Cap Index is less risky and outperforms the Top 40 index; thus making it imperative for fund managers to reconsider their investment strategies. ‘The lack of funding to support my studies was one of the major challenges that I faced, therefore I had to work full-time and studied from 2am to 6am before getting ready for work.’ Prince’s future plans include serving his two-year term on the Investment Competency Committee of the Financial Planning Institute where he is a member, and continuing with his post-doctoral studies at UKZN with the aim of practicing as a wealth manager.
 
 
 
Dr Akinola Morakinyo
  Thesis Title: The ‘MINT’ Economies and Non-performing Loans
Supervisor: Professor Mabutho Sibanda and Dr Colette Muller

The study examines non-performing loans (NPLs) in the economies of Mexico, Indonesia, Nigeria and Turkey (MINT) and identifies NPLs as the main cause of banking system crises, which limit economic growth. The study recommends a higher level of proactive policies for the countries where they learn from one another as their economies are similar. Morakinyo had to travel between Nigeria and South Africa for the first seven months of his studies and eventually relocated his wife and children to South Africa. He has been in the banking industry in Nigeria for over 25 years and plans to return to his home country and help in growing the economy in different capacities.
 
 
 
Dr Norah Msuya
 
  Thesis Title: Harmful Cultural and Traditional Practices: A Roadblock in the Implementation of the Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women and the Maputo Protocol on Women’s Rights in Tanzania
Supervisor: Professor Nomthandazo Ntlama

The thesis examined aspects of the existing culture and traditions that trample women’s rights. The study discovered that several discriminatory laws that negatively impact women’s rights are still enforced and that plans to amend these laws have been hampered by strong traditional resistance. Msuya had to relocate to Durban from Tanzania, leaving her husband and children behind but later took on single parenting duties when she decided to also relocate the children. She is an assistant lecturer at the Faculty of Law in Mzumbe University and a practising Advocate of the High Court of Tanzania. She is also the Coordinator and Founder Member of Tanzania Legal Aid Organisation for Women and Children which is a non-governmental organisation that provides legal assistance and education to women and children in Tanzania.
 


Dr Alphonce Shiri

  Thesis Title: A Conceptual Model to Enhance Leadership Styles in Life Insurance Policies Sales with a View to Enhance Performance and Emotional States of Employees
Supervisor: Professor Ziska Fields

Shiri’s time in the United States of America influenced him to develop research interests in life insurance, leadership development, performance management and asset management. He observed that life insurance sales people in Zimbabwe face numerous challenges in selling policies therefore his study focused on the impact of various leadership models on the performance and emotional commitment of insurance policy sales staff. ‘The major challenge was that the employer could only grant a one year paid study leave and in the second year, I had to commit to numerous trips between South Africa and Zimbabwe and travelling became more difficult due to the new Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe transfers restrictions.’ Shiri’s goal is to become a renowned researcher and set up a consultancy.
 


Dr Stephen Mpembele

  Thesis Title: Financial Literacy Amongst Informal Enterprise Owners in Zambia
Supervisor: Professor Mabutho Sibanda

The study sought to determine the effect of financial literacy on the usage of financial services among informal enterprise owners in Zambia. ‘A growing number of Zambians are shifting towards entrepreneurship as they seek fresh business opportunities away from the formal sector which has shrunk quite significantly in recent years. However, there are some challenges associated with the informal sector, chiefly lack of skills in managing money, which is also known as financial illiteracy’. Mpembele is a full-time staff member at the Copperbelt University in Zambia and his plans include focusing on his academic career as he believes that Africa’s economic salvation lies in education, especially at higher levels.
 


Dr Adelakun Adejeji


  Thesis Title: Social Entrepreneurship Management: Pedagogical Initiatives Orientation for the Creation of Social Ventures at Designated Nigerian Universities
Supervisor: Dr Mervywin Williamson

‘The motivation behind the study was the gap identified in the literature that required the extension of the borders of knowledge by providing clarification on the relationship between social pedagogy and students’ behavioural outcomes in Nigerian universities.’ Adejeji hopes this study will offer practical solutions to problems identified by the literature thus benefiting the Management of Nigerian Universities. Adejeji faced a setback when his first proposal on Environmental Scanning was rejected by the Higher Degrees Committee. He was so discouraged and had every intention of giving up and going back home to Nigeria. Through prayer and his wife’s encouragement, he got the strength to go back to the Committee the following month and doing his presentation and completing his PhD within two years.
 


Dr Niresh Bachoo

 
Thesis Title: Factors Influencing Consumer Behaviour in the Procurement/Free Downloading of Mobile Applications: A Case Study of Students at the University of KwaZulu-Natal (UKZN)
Supervisor: Professor Sadhasivan Perumal and Professor Brian McArthur

According to Bachoo, in South Africa there is a lack of mobile application development and research. The research problem is that the factors driving consumers to download mobile applications is unknown. The study assesses the relationship between consumer behaviour and the purchasing/free downloading of mobile applications among students at the University of KwaZulu-Natal (UKZN). Bachoo believes that like major companies such as Apple, South Africa can become the shining light in Africa for a progressive strategy for mobile application development and marketing adding a positive impact on the country’s economy. Bachoo thanks his parents, and Professor Perumal and Professor McArthur for being there for him motivating him to pursue his PhD as he found it hard to balance it with his job as a Jnr Director at an electrical consulting and contracting company.
 


Dr Phumzile Dlamini

 
 
Thesis Title: Improving Performance Monitoring and Evaluation in South African Local Governments Institutions
Supervisor: Professor Stephen Migiro

With her experience in employee relations after working for the KwaZulu-Natal Department of Health, the Office of the Premier, the Department of Transport and currently working at the University of South Africa in Pretoria, Dlamini felt that she needed to contribute to the body of knowledge she had acquired about issues of performance monitoring and evaluation in the society we are living in, especially in government. Dlamini says municipalities are the sphere of the government close to the community and have the responsibility to account as to where our money goes and what remedial action is in place in the event of deviation by municipal officials. The study aims to benefit every administrator either in the private or public sector that resources are always accounted for as people always want to see results. Dlamini aspires to become an academic so that she can impart her knowledge to other students and motivate them never to give up in life. She also wants to assist municipalities who have agreed to help during her studies to share best practices in terms of instilling good governance in their area of responsibility.
 


             Dr Paul Kariuki 

 
Thesis Title: Developing a Human Resource Framework for Monitoring and Evaluation of Personnel in Selected Municipalities in KwaZulu-Natal
Supervisor: Professor Purshottama Reddy

Ever since he relocated from Kenya to South Africa in 2001, Kariuki has been curious about local government and its work, especially its ability to deliver basic services to citizens efficiently and professionally. ‘It is my passion about the sector coupled with the curiosity to seek answers that drove me to pursue an extensive study about monitoring and evaluating human resource capacity in the sector, focusing on selected municipalities in KwaZulu-Natal,’ said Kariuki. His study aims to benefit the monitoring and evaluation community in general, specifically, human resource practitioners, local government practitioners, researchers and policy makers in the public sector. He intends on pursuing a post-doctoral fellowship and to improve his research skills by publishing as many articles as he can from his PhD.
 

Dr Ntokozo Makoba


 
Thesis Title: Values Underlying Traditional Leadership and Governance and South African Constitutional Imperatives: A Case of Umgungundlovu District Municipality in KwaZulu-Natal
Supervisor: Dr Fayth Ruffin

The choice of leaving a high ranking position in the public sector to join UKZN as development lecturer to hone her academic skills continues to yield results for Makoba who was promoted to lecturer in April this year. Her study is exploratory multi-mode qualitative research driven by grounded theory strategies in five case studies in sub-areas of Umgungundlovu - eMathulini, eMhlangandlovu, eMpumuza, eNhlazuka and kwaManyavu. ‘I think that the research has interesting findings which are important not only for South Africa but for any country which is a constitutional democracy recognising traditional leadership. The study has resulted in relations being created with amakhosi and the people in these areas. As a way of giving back to the community, I have been able to arrange business training as well as conduct training on conflict resolution for traditional councils,’ said Makoba.
 


Dr Pfano Mashau

 
Thesis Title: University Innovation Centres as Drivers of Entrepreneurship and Agglomeration Economies
Supervisor: Professor Ziska Fields

The study explored how innovation centres support entrepreneurs as well as the benefits of having entrepreneurs housed in the same space. His study involved five of South Africa’s top research universities. When he is not exploring entrepreneurship and innovation, Mashau is thinking about home in the rural Tshisaulu village near Thohoyandou in Limpopo and how he can get the youth in his community to study further. ‘When I am home I chat with learners from my old high school about opportunities available to them. I also talk to my friends and anyone feeling trapped in their jobs about postgraduate studies,’ said Mashau. To clear his mind, Mashau enjoys long distance cycling. He participated in the challenging 105km aQuelle Tour Durban earlier this year and is looking forward to the Amashova 2017 later this month.
 


Dr Sagaren Govender
 
 
Thesis Title: Developing a Leadership Model to Enhance Health Care Service Delivery in Regional Hospitals
Supervisor: Dr Cecile Gerwel Proches and Dr Abdulla Kader

With more than 30 years of experience in KwaZulu-Natal’s public health care sector, PhD graduate Dr Sagaren Govender has first-hand experience of the negative effect an exodus of skilled and professional staff has on health care service delivery and is hoping his research will help provide solutions. ‘Currently, the public health care sector is facing a myriad challenges impacting negatively on health care service delivery,’ said Govender. ‘Critical posts can take up to six months to fill when they become vacant, which results in increased workloads for existing staff when such posts are not filled timeously. For example, the KZN Department of Health is currently facing a drastic shortage of oncologists who are critically needed to treat patients in the region,’ said Govender.The study explores leadership in relation to health care service delivery at RK Khan Hospital, King Edward VIII Hospital, Prince Mshiyeni Memorial Hospital and Grey’s Hospital in Pietermaritzburg. It identified leadership as being fundamentally important for improving service delivery in regional hospitals.
 


Dr Njabulo Khumalo

 
Thesis Title: The Role of Human Resource Planning on Service Delivery in Sizakala Customer Care Centres in eThekwini Municipality
Supervisor: Dr Emmanuel Mutambara and Dr Bonginkosi Zondi

‘The study’s findings reveal that in these centres, components of human resources planning investments are not being implemented effectively; there is no clear strategy for the development of employees and promotions in these centres; and there is a need for the working environment to be improved. This is very interesting and I hope that the Municipality will consult me for advice in planning for the enhancement of service delivery in their Sizakala Customer Care Centres,’ said Khumalo. Looking to the future, Khumalo is planning to enrol for a Law degree next year and will use his PhD as a stepping stone towards becoming a professor and an expert in the field of leadership especially in human resource planning.
 
Dr Noel Jacob

Dr Noel Jacob

 
Thesis Title: Developing a Model of Organisational Success: A case of Link Healthcare Pty Ltd Business Implementationsa
Supervisor: Dr Muhammad Hoque

Citation: A significant number of liquidations and insolvencies have been reported by Statistics South Africa. The estimated number of insolvencies has increased by 12.6% year-on-year. This study resulted in the development of a Five Wheel Model for Organisational Success comprising key areas, namely, Global Expansion; Leadership Dimensions; Organisational Strategies; Organisational Structure; and Culture and Expertise/Efficient Key Departments, all of which collectively, were shown to deliver organisational growth and success.
 




Dr Abdulkader Cassim Mahomedy
 
Thesis Title: Why the Rationalist Foundations of Modern Science are Unsuitable for Ismail Economics
Supervisor: Professor Masudul Alam Choudhury and Professor GT Harris

The thesis examined aspects of the existing culture and traditions that trample women’s rights. The study discovered that several discriminatory laws that negatively impact women’s rights are still enforced and that plans to amend these laws have been hampered by strong traditional resistance. Msuya had to relocate to Durban from Tanzania, leaving her husband and children behind but later took on single parenting duties when she decided to also relocate the children. She is an assistant lecturer at the Faculty of Law in Mzumbe University and a practising Advocate of the High Court of Tanzania. She is also the Coordinator and Founder Member of Tanzania Legal Aid Organisation for Women and Children which is a non-governmental organisation that provides legal assistance and education to women and children in Tanzania.
 


Dr Abdulkader Cassim Mahomedy

 
Thesis Title: Human Capital for Rural Infrastructure Development in South Africa: A Project-based Pedagogical Analysis
Supervisor: Dr Fayth Ruffin

The research identified the lack of project management human capital across two provinces, two government departments and four universities, and found there was a disconnection between project management human capital development and rural infrastructure project delivery. ‘The study identifies the need for Higher Education Institutions to introduce novel rural project management teaching, grounded in indigeneity and driven by African philosophies and inclusive of community-centred concerns to guide South African rural infrastructure development.’ Qwabe described his doctoral journey as challenging and daunting as he lost his father during his studies, and therefore dedicates this achievement to his late father.
 
 

Dr Siza Majola


 
Thesis Title: Developing a Stakeholder Management Model Based on an African Traditional Community- Bafokeng Case Study
Supervisor: Professor Thokozani Nzimakwe

‘My motivation for doing this study came when I worked for one of the most progressive communities in Africa - the royal Bafokeng. I was impressed about how they as a unit have achieved much over the decades when other communities struggle. As I engaged with the community I realised that part of their secret to success lies in how they engage with each other.’ The study recommends broadening the knowledge of stakeholder management patterns within traditionally governed African communities. Majola described her doctoral journey as ‘full of challenges’ as each phase of the research process presented its own challenges but she overcame them by setting her mind on the right path. She has recently joined a JSE-listed private education company and hopes to either lecture or supervise research studies for UKZN. ‘I have always been passionate about education and it feels surreal that I can finally add my bit in improving the South African academic sector’.
 


Dr Dumisa Mango

 
Thesis Title: Analysing Challenges Impeding the Implementation of Municipal Strategies in Mpumalanga Province: A Study of Msukaligwa Local Municipality
Supervisor: Dr C Sanangura

The principal objective of the study was to analyse the challenges i.e. communication, organisational culture, finances, human resources, structure or control, objectives and leadership, whether or not they impede strategy implementation at Msukaligwa Local Municipality. The results revealed that structure and finances have the greatest impacts while culture and objectives were in the middle whereas communication, leadership and human resources have minimum impacts on strategy implementation at the Municipality.
 


Dr Portia Sifolo


 
Thesis Title: A Tourism Stakeholder Management Supply Chain Framework for Economic Contribution for Northern Cape Province, South Africa
Supervisor: Dr Muhammed Hoque

The study investigated the importance of stakeholder engagement in the tourism sector. The case of Northern Cape is used to illustrate the point regarding the importance of stakeholder engagement for optimum use of the tourism sector to achieve economic growth. The study findings showed significant levels of inconsistency of perceived engagements among the key stakeholders in the public and private tourism entities.
 


Dr Daniel Wicomb

 
 
Thesis Title: Customer Relationship Management in Call Centres: An Eskom Perspective
Supervisor: Professor IW Ferreira and Professor Brian Mcarthur

Wicomb examined the role of call centres in the implementation process of Customer Relationship Management (CRM) strategic software packages at ESKOM. Findings include an underestimation by the company’s management of the significance of the role of call centres in its strategy initiatives. Challenges encountered during the upgrade of the CRM system were identified and can be addressed by applying the conceptual model proposed in this study.
 
Dr Franaaz Khan

Dr Franaaz Khan

 
 
Thesis Title: Legal and policy Implications of Learner Pregnancies in South Africa - A Case Study in KwaZulu-Natal
Supervisor: Professor David McQuiod-Mason and Professor Ann Strode

‘Given the current status of learner pregnancies in SA, I hope that the findings of this study will benefit pregnant pupils who have been unable to achieve their full educational potential due to their pregnancies,’ she said. For Khan, graduating with her PhD was not the only thing to celebrate as she gave birth to a beautiful baby girl a week before the Graduation ceremony. ‘As a wife and a first time mom, life is all about balancing different aspects of your life successfully. PhD is a lonely journey and it is physically, emotionally and mentally challenging. I am grateful for my parents’ support as they were my pillars of strength during these difficult times and they encouraged me never to give up,’ said Khan.
 
Dr Ayansola Ayandibu

Dr Ayansola Ayandibu

 
 
Thesis Title: Strategic Innovation as a Tool for Improved Performance Amongst Small and Micro Businesses
Supervisor: Dr Jennifer Houghton

In his research, Ayandibu focuses on the importance of Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SMEs) and how they drive economic growth and development in South Africa and around the world. ‘I pursued a PhD on the improvement of the functioning of SMEs operations because I noticed most of the complaints of small business owners were basically about lack of funds. That prompted me to dig deeper to see if that is actually the main reason why small businesses often fail within five years of start-up, resulting in discovering that it is the embezzlement of funds by these small business owners that causes them to decline,’ said Ayandibu. Ayandibu is passionate about passing on his entrepreneurial knowledge to his students. This inspired him to pursue his PhD in Leadership Studies. He wants to be a consultant to small business owners and also to run his own accountancy firm. He aims to continue lecturing and specialise in the fields of Accounting, Economics and Management.
 

Dr Sebuhuzu Gisanabagabo

 
Thesis Title: Financial Sector Development and Economic Growth in Rwanda
Supervisor: Professor Harold Ngalawa

The study set out to investigate the relationship between financial sector development and economic growth in Rwanda. It established that unexpected changes in the domestic private sector credit account for the largest proportion of fluctuations in real output growth, supporting the supply-leading hypothesis in the intermediation link between financial sector development and economic growth in Rwanda. It also found that the repayment period has a negative effect on non-performing loans.
 
    Words by: Thandiwe Jumo, Sibonelo Shinga and Reatlehile Moeti Photographs by: Abhi Indrarajan

Facebook Twitter DZone It! Digg It! StumbleUpon Technorati Del.icio.us NewsVine Reddit Blinklist Add diigo bookmark


Contact Webmaster | View the Promotion of Access to Information Act | View our Privacy Policy
© University of KwaZulu-Natal: All Rights Reserved