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Entrepreneurial Thinking Should Begin at a Young Age

October 26, 2017


                                                     Attendees of the group-in-class mentorship programme.


If in 2017 you are only going to school to enable you to get a job later then you are most likely going to be disappointed, says successful Pietermaritzburg businessman, Mr Lindo Makhaye.

Makhaye - founder of Lusizo IT Solutions, an organisation that provides home technology installations solutions - was speaking at a presentation he gave for second year UKZN Entrepreneurship students.

Makhaye was invited by the module co-ordinator, Ms Lindiwe Kunene, to host a series of lectures on campuses where the module is offered.

The lectures aimed to broaden the minds of students to enable them to view entrepreneurship as a career choice and use their theoretical training during practical exercises.

Makhaye, a former student of Kunene’s, reminisced about how he used to sell sweets at junior school to earn extra money and said entrepreneurial thinking and behaviour should start at an early age.

‘I remember my grandmother would give me R50 to buy a packet of chocolate éclairs and sell them at school. We shared the spoils! This led me to saving up my money until I could buy two packets. I would share the profits of one packet with my grandmother with the money I made on the second would keep for myself.

‘If entrepreneurship is your thing you need to be in it already,’ said Makhaye.

Makhaye say his uncle Mr Sibusiso Makhaye – who owned a construction company which brought in enough money to feed and educate the entire family – was his entrepreneurial role model.

Fast forward to the present, Makhaye owns the biggest MultiChoice agency in South Africa. He believes succeeding in business means investing in your employees and constantly keeping your fingers on the pulse.

‘Never be too detached from the action. The most important investment you can make as an entrepreneur is to build people and they will in turn build the business,’ said Makhaye.

‘One of the important mechanisms to fast track entrepreneurship learning and practice is through mentorship,’ said Kunene. ‘This year we are running group-in-class mentorship programmes. Mr Makhaye has committed to providing 10 video case studies on his company based on our curricula. His presence has created excitement among students and they have become inquisitive and eager to learn and do more.’

Words: Sibonelo Shinga

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